Daily Archives: September 3, 2014

Brass (from “Automobile Topics,” 1912)

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The Knickerbocker Brass Goods Mfg. Co., of New York City, which petitioned itself into bankruptcy last week, would like to have some of the money that is listed on its books as due it, and for this reason has brought suit in the New York Supreme Court against the Only Motor Car Co., of Port Jefferson, L.I., and New York City. The Only company ordered lamps to the amount of $208.75 from the Knickerbocker concern, which were delivered on September 14, 1912, but which, according to the complaint, have not been paid for.

Automobile Topics, 1912

The Handle Company

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Mr. Knickerbocker went to South Boardman, and there had a talk with Mr. Edmiston and Mr. Murray about securing the bank for the indebtedness due it from the Michigan Handle Company; that at this time Mr. Knickerbocker knew nothing of the indebtedness of the handle company, except that to the bank, and $400 or $500 outside of that; that at this time an arrangement was made with the handle company, through Mr. Edmiston, that a mortgage should be given to the bank to secure it and the endorsers of the notes; that, when the arrangement was to be carried out, Mr. Knickerbocker was to be notified, and bring his own attorney down there to draw the papers; that this arrangement was not carried out, but he learned a day or two later that the mortgage to Murray as trustee had been executed; that he never accepted the terms of this mortgage.

The Northwestern Reporter, 1898

Knickerbocker Trust Company

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…by reason of the acts of the said John D. Parsons, Jr., in transferring the said several sums of money to the said Knickerbocker Trust Company in the year 1904, this defendant has lost the possession of the respective sums of $11,707.85 and $1,388.25, and $92,549.74, with interest to this date, and no part thereof has been repaid to it except that the whole of the said special deposit has been returned to this defendant other than the sum of $28,093.61, which sum with interest thereon from December 16th, 1905, this defendant has been deprived of by the act of the said John D. Parsons, Jr. That demand has been made of the said Knickerbocker Trust Company for the return of the said sum of $28,093.61, but that said demand has been refused, and that said Knickerbocker Trust Company claims the right to apply the said $28,093.61 upon failure to collect the amount from the estate of the said John D. Parsons, Jr.

Supreme Court, 1909

More Due

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Footnote: When a country sends forth to other countries more products and manufactures than it buys from them, it is obvious that it will receive in payment more money than it pays out. Then the “balance of trade” is said to be in its favor, for, taking the country all together, there is more due it from abroad than it owes abroad, and money must come to pay the indebtedness. If everyone who left Broek came back with more money than he had carried away, it would be as if the balance of trade were always in their favor.

Irving, Knickerbocker Stories, 1898

Doubts

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‘…Doubts have arisen in the breast of the royal Henry as to the validity of your Majesty’s union, seeing that you had been the wife of an elder brother.‘
“My Lord of York,’ said the Queen, rising from her seat, and casting upon the conscience-stricken prelate a look that would have annihilated a mind less firm than his, —’thou sayest Henry, my Lord, has had doubts, —thou shouldst have said, ‘I, Cardinal Wolsey, have instilled doubts into the mind of my sovereign:’ this would be true. I am acquainted with thy proceedings; thy purposes may possibly be completed; but yet, alone as I am, unprotected and a foreigner, I fear thee not. I have that within which thou canst not destroy, —a quiet conscience; that which thou hast never velt, —a mind at peace. I am the daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella, —the aunt of Charles of Germany, —The Queen of Henry of England! The latter title I hold by the bonds of marriage, —by a dispensation given by the Pope Julius, —recognized by the English Bishops, —acted upon by my royal husband, —sealed on earth and registered in heaven. And dost thou think to annul this holy obligation? Wouldst thou break down the strong barriers of the church, —burst asunder the bonds of relition, and destroy conjugal felicity? Art thou really a man of God, as thy habit implies?

The Fate of Wolsey, 1835

From The Facts

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Robertson, in these rank misstatements, could not, we think, have had the plea of ignorance; for the account of the conquerors themselves was a full contradiction of his assertions. From the facts before him, therefore, we are compelled to conclude that prejudice, incredulity, or a spirit of willful perversion, dictated these erroneous statements. Our descriptions will hereafter show how wide from truth these statements are. The high reputation of Robertson as a historian will hardly atone for the errors here fixed upon him. It might be thought that prejudice or incredulity caused the Spanish inhabitants of the neighboring places to be so long silent on this subject, inasmuch as they can hardly be considered likely to have formed a correct opinion of the remoteness of the Tultican monuments, if they had noticed them, or speculated at all upon their origin.

American Antiquities, 1837

The Antiquities of Tultica and Mexico

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Another reason why the world was kept in ignorance of the antiquities of Tultica and Mexico, or, as the whole was anciently called, Anahuoe, is attributable to the gross misrepresentations of Robertson, the historian, who, as everyone knows, wrote the history of the conquest of Mexico. This writer says but little of the Mexican arts that is calculated to excite astonishment; and what is said by him, plainly evinces the strangest ignorance of facts, or an unpardonable and sillful perversion of truth. He says, in fact, that ‘there is not in all the extent of New Spain, any monument or vestige of building more ancient than the conquest.’ ‘The great Temple of Chollula,’ he says, ‘was nothing but a mound of solid earth, without any facing or steps, covered with grass and shrubs!’ He also says, that ‘the houses of the people of Mexico were but huts, built of turf, or branches of trees, like those of the rudest Indians!’

American Antiquities, 1837

The Palenquan City (1837)

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The natives themselves, from a just reverence for the relics of their ancestors, and a religious regard for the objects of their worship, withheld all intelligence respecting them from their cruel tyrants, and the occupants of their favored soil. At length, however, the facts in relation to the Palenquan city were revealed by some Spaniards, who, having penetrated into the dreary solitudes of a high and distant desert, discovered, to their astonishment, that they were surrounded by the remains of a once large and splendid city, the probable capital of an unknown and immeasurably remote empire! These facts were communicated by them to one of the governors of a neighboring province, who, on ascertaining the truth of the representations from the natives, wrote to his royal master, the king of Spain, to induce him to command an exploration of these strange ruins.

American Antiquities, 1837

Gold Dazzled Their Eyes

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Gold dazzled their eyes, bewildered their judgment, and inflamed their passions, at every point of their unrighteous contests. The swarms of desperate and adventurous priests, battening on the spoils of victory, were only content in the grossest luxuries, or in destroying, ‘for the sake of the holy religion,’ every vestige of antiquity which fell in their way. The manner in which this ‘holy zeal’ was carried out, and to which we shall hereafter allude, is revolting to reason, and sickening to humanity. This in the early history of Spanish discovery, or aggression, every nobler purpose was sacrificed by the clergy and the soldiery to their base idols, and every Christian virtue made subservient to wanton indulgence, or cruel bigotry. In view of this, it is not surprising that the singular ruins of ancient Mexican and Tultican cities should have had little attraction for the selfish and barbarous victors, or that many curious and antique relics should have disappeared before the superstitious frenzy of religious zealots. It is more than probable, that the monumental ruins of Chiapa, of Yucatan, and particularly those of the great Palenquan city of Yucatan, and particularly those of the great Palenquan city, were, in fact, unknown to the European invaders, and to their descendants, until about the time we have mentioned.

American Antiquities, 1837

Cavaliers (from “Grand Prior of Minorca,” 1840)

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Among the Spanish cavaliers, was one named Don Luis de Lima Vasconcellos. He was distantly related to the Grand Master; and had been enrolled at an early age among his pages, but had been rapidly promoted by him, until, at the age of twenty-six, he had been given the richest Spanish commandery in the order. He had, moreover, been fortunate with the fair, with one of whom, the most beautiful honorata of Malta, he had long maintained the most tender correspondence. The character, rank, and connections of Don Luis put him on a par with the imperious Commander de Foulquerre, and pointed him out as a leader and champion to his countrymen. The Spanish chevaliers repaired to him, therefore, in a body; represented all the grievances they had sustained, and the evils they apprehanded, and urged him to use his influence with the commander and his adherents to put a stop to the growing abuses.

Grand Prior of Minorca, 1840